Matsumura Shorin-ryu


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Dojo Kata's

Dojo Information

YELLOW BELT

NEKO-BUDO ICHI: This Kata was made up by, Master Phil Koeppel around 1960. It came from his style, which at that time was "Kajei-kempo". It is the first (1st) Kata taught in Sensei Webster's dojo. The English translation is: WARRIOR CAT FORM #1.

ORANGE BELT

NEKO-BUDO NI; This Kata is the second Kata from a series of five (5) Katas that were made up by Master Phil Koeppel around 1960. It is the second (2nd) Kata taught in Sensei Webster's dojo. The English translation is: WARRIOR CAT FORM #2.

PINAN NI-DAN: The information on this Kata is the same as below. It too was thought to be from the old Kata "Channan", and Master ITOSU taught it to the public around 1901. This is the third (3rd) Kata taught in Sensei Webster's dojo. The English translation is: PEACEFUL MIND LEVEL 2

BLUE BELT

PINAN-SHO-DAN: This Kata was reputedly thought to be made up from a old Kata called "Channan". The Kata is lost, but legend has it that "Bushi Matsumura" either devised this Kata from that Kata or was from an older Kata of Chinese origin. However one of Matsumura's students, ANKO ITOSU, is credited with making up this Kata and teaching it to the public around 1901. This is the fourth (4th) Kata taught in Sensei Webster's dojo. The English translation is: PEACEFUL MIND LEVEL 1.

NAIHANCHI SHO-DAN: The origin of this Kata is unknown, but it can be traced back to "Bushi Matsumura" and was practiced as one Kata around 1825. We can assume that the Naihanchi Katas are over 175 years old. Because of it's length and degree of difficulty, the Kata was divided into 3 sections for teaching purposes. A point of interest with this Kata is that although it was developed by Shuri-ryu masters, it has become an international form that is performed in almost every major style of Karate, Taekwan-do and Kempo today. This is the fifth (5th) Kata taught in Sensei Webster's dojo. The English translation is: NAIHANCHI (FIGHTING, HOLDING YOUR GROUND) NAIFUNCHIN (IRON HORSE, MISSING ENEMY) TEKKI (HORSE STANCE KATA)

GREEN BELT

PINAN SAN-DAN: This Kata was made up by Master ANKO ITOSU from such Katas as "KUSANKU" and "MATSUMURA NO PASSAI". He taught this Kata (along with the other 4) at the Junior High schools, in Okinawa. This is the sixth (6th) Kata taught is Sensei Webster's dojo. The English translation is: PEACEFUL MIND, LEVEL 3.

TOMARI NO WANSU: This Kata, it is believed, was named after a Chinese military envoy who taught the people of Tomari village around the late 1600's. This Kata emphasizes speed and contains a throwing technique. The Kata also strongly emphasizes the use of left and right arm punches. For this reason, some styles call this Kata "STRONG ARM" form. TATSUO SHIMABUKU called it "DRAGON BOY or DUMPING FORM". It is the seventh (7th) Kata taught in Sensei Webster's dojo. The English translation is: WANSU (CHINESE MILITARY ENVOY) WANSHU (DRAGON BOY or DUMPING FORM)

PURPLE BELT

PINAN YO-DAN: This Kata was made up by Master ANKO ITOSU from such Katas as "KUSANKU" and "MATSUMURA NO PASSAI". He taught this Kata (along with the other 4) in the Junior High schools, in Okinawa. This is the eighth (8th) Kata taught is Sensei Webster's dojo. The English translation is: PEACEFUL MIND, LEVEL 4.

NAIHANCHI NI-DAN: The origin of this Kata is unknown, but it can be traced back to "Bushi Matsumura" and was practiced as one Kata around 1825. We can assume that the Naihanchi Katas are over 175 years old. Because of it's length and degree of difficulty, the Kata was divided into 3 sections for teaching purposes. A point of interest with this Kata is that although it was developed by Shuri-ryu masters, it has become an international form that is performed in almost every major style of Karate, Tae-kwan-do and Kempo today. This is the ninth (9th) Kata taught in Sensei Webster's dojo. The English translation is: NAIHANCHI (FIGHTING, HOLDING YOUR GROUND) NAIFUNCHIN (IRON HORSE, MISSING ENEMY) TEKKI (HORSE STANCE KATA)

3rd BROWN BELT

PINAN GO-DAN: This Kata was made up by Master ANKO ITOSU from such Katas as "KUSANKU" and "MATSUMURA NO PASSAI". He taught this Kata (along with the other 4) in the Junior High schools, in Okinawa. This is the tenth (10th) Kata taught is Sensei Webster's dojo. The English translation is: PEACEFUL MIND, LEVEL 5

TOMARI NO ANANKU: This Kata is believed to have been brought back from Taiwan by CHOTOKU KIYAN around 1895. Little else is known about this Kata. There are different versions of this Kata that are taught in the different Shorin systems. This is the eleventh (11th) Kata taught in Sensei Webster’s Dojo. The English translation is: TOMARI NO ANANKU (PEACE or SAFETY) ANAKU (SMALL BIRD WALKING/TURNING)

2nd BROWN BELT

PASSAI-SHO: This Kata was developed by ANKO (Yasutsune) ITOSU [1830 -1915] from the Kata “Passai Dai” or “Matsumura No Passai”. It stresses the use of hips in generating power and how to protect oneself by shifting so as not to expose vital points. It is said that there are 4 different versions of this Kata taught today. This is the twelfth (12th) Kata taught in Sensei Webster’s Dojo. The English translation is: PASSAI-SHO (PENETRATE A SMALL FORTRESS) BASSAI (BREAKING A SMALL FORTRESS) ALSO KNOWN AS: ITOSU NO PASSAI

SEISAN: This old Kata is said to have it’s origins traced back to China. The developer is unknown. This Kata has two quite different version, “Naha-te and Shuri-te”. Shuri-te version is the one Sensei Webster teaches. This Kata includes techniques repeated in combinations of three. This Kata is the thirteenth (13th) taught in Sensei Webster’s Dojo. The English translation is: SEISAN (THIRTEEN or THIRTY) HANGETSU (HALF MOON) ALSO KNOWN AS: SEISHAN.

1st BROWN BELT

PASSAI-DAI: The oral tradition has this Kata as being originated in China. The developer is unknown, but this Kata was practice by BUSHI MATSUMURA and his wife. Also this Kata was taught in Tomari by KOSAKU MATSUMURA. This Kata is used in almost all systems in different varieties. This Kata is the fourteenth (14th) taught in Sensei Webster’s Dojo. The English translation is: PASSAI-DAI (PENETRATE A LARGE FORTRESS) BASSAI-DAI (BREAKING A LARGE FORTRESS) ALSO KNOWN AS “MATSUMURA NO PASSAI”

NAIHANCHI SAN-DAN: The origin of this Kata is unknown, but it can be traced back to "Bushi Matsumura" and was practiced as one Kata ( there are 3) around 1825. We can assume that the Naihanchi Katas are over 175 years old. Because of it's length and degree of difficulty, the Kata was divided into 3 sections for teaching purposes. A point of interest with this Kata is that although it was developed by Shuri-ryu masters, it has become an international form that is performed in almost every major style of Karate, Taekwan-do and Kempo today. This Kata was not included in the Katas that Hohan Soken taught. This is the fifteenth (15th) Kata taught in Sensei Webster's dojo. The English translation is: NAIHANCHI (FIGHTING, HOLDING YOUR GROUND) NAIFUNCHIN (IRON HORSE, MISSING ENEMY) TEKKI (HORSE STANCE KATA)

1st BLACK BELT

CHINTO: According to legend this Kata was made up by a Chinese sailor who was shipwrecked in the Ryukyu Islands around 200 years ago. This Kata features, one-legged stances, balance maneuvers, evasion techniques, a throwing technique and a double kick. Chinto Kata could have been introduced to the city of Tomari first because of that styles version being more of a Chinese flair, however the form this Dojo works is from Shorin. This is the sixteenth (16th) Kata taught in Sensei Webster’s dojo. The English translations are: FIGHTING TO THE EAST - CHINESE VISITOR TO OKINAWA - CRANE ON A ROCK

2nd BLACK BELT

ROHAI: This form was probably either brought to Okinawa by a visiting Chinese or an Okinawan returning from China, in any case, it’s origin is known to be Chinese. This form has many one-legged stances which purpose is to shift away from an attack and be ready to deliver a kick. The date of this form is lost but it was taught in Tomari before the 1870’s. Master Itosu is said to have developed the Shodan, Nidan and Sandan version of this form. This is the seventeenth (17th) Kata taught in Sensei Webster’s dojo. The English translation is: VISION OF A CRANE

3rd BLACK BELT

GOJUSHIHO: The old Chinese name for this Kata was called “Useishi”. This Kata emphasizes the use of open-handed techniques (Nukite), various circular crane blocking movements and an attack with the crane beak. This Kata has been referred to as the “Drunken Man” Kata because of certain side to side staggering movements, but this movement is only found in the Tomari-te’s version. It has been noted that this Kata was developed from the Tiger and Crane styles of Chinese Kempo. Some say that the Gojushiho Kata is among the oldest Okinawan Katas. This is the eighteenth (18th) Kata taught in Sensei Webster’s dojo. The English translation is: FIFTY-FOUR STEPS

4th BLACK BELT

KUSANKU: This Kata is the longest of the Shuri-te’s Katas. Tradition has said that Karate Sakugawa developed this Kata from the teaching of Kusanku (1756) from China. However, there are several variations: Kusanku-dai, Kusanku-sho and Shiho Kusanku. Another variation is called Kanku-sho. This Kata contains unique defenses and counter attacks, twisting and evasive techniques and a double kick. This is the nineteenth (19) Kata taught in Sensei Webster’s Dojo. The English translation is: CHINESE MILITARY ENVOY

5th BLACK BELT

HAPPOREN: Happoren is said to have originated from the Babulien (Eight Linked Steps) form of Fuzhou White Crane. Tradition has said that this Kata came from China. Another name this Kata has been known by is Papporen. Not much is really known about this Kata except most say it is part of the KAKUTSURA (White Crane) style. This is the twentieth (20th) Kata taught in Master Webster’s Dojo. The English translation is: WHOOPING CRANE, CALLING CRANE and EIGHT STEPS AT A TIME. The number of attackers are to be determined by the person giving the bunkai.


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